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Date:         Sat, 26 Jul 2008 00:48:01 +0530
Reply-To:     ohri2007@GMAIL.COM
Sender:       "SAS(r) Discussion" <SAS-L@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
From:         ohri2007@GMAIL.COM
Subject:      Re: Propensity scores
Comments: To: Kevin Viel <citam.sasl@gmail.com>
In-Reply-To:  <200807251807.m6PGb4lo007660@malibu.cc.uga.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Hello Kevin,

what is the next best alternative to creating a propensity score for marketing purpose using statistical techniques. is there an online version of this journal .

Regards,

Ajay www.decisionstats.com www.iwannacrib.com

On 7/25/08, Kevin Viel <citam.sasl@gmail.com> wrote: > On Fri, 25 Jul 2008 11:17:17 -0400, Peter Flom > <peterflomconsulting@MINDSPRING.COM> wrote: > >>The topic of propensity scores has come up a couple times recently. >> >>People interested in these should check out the latest American >>Statistician, especially: >> >>Peikes, DN; Moreno, L; Orzol, SM (2008). Propensity score matching: A >>note of caution for evaluators of social programs. American Statistician, >>62, 222-231. >> >>Essentially, they found that, even under ideal conditions, propensity >>scores give incorrect results. > > Nice find, Peter. Analysts need to know what a propensity score is and > that it is may have its shortcomings. > > Kevin >


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